Editor's picks

01
Christoph Sydow's picture
Votes : 7
Syrians will be able to live peacefully together again, but the impetus most come from the diaspora.
1) The last centuries and decades have seen ethnic and confessional tensions in Syria. Still, Damascus, Aleppo, Latakia and other cities were centres of interaction–peacefully most of the time. This heritage is a robust basis to overcome the horrors of the civil war in the long run.
2) Millions of Syrians have fled the war abroad. Most of them are Sunnis, but many Shiites, Christians and Alawites had to leave their homes, as well. These diaspora communities have to take the initiative for reconciliation. Far away from home, they have the chance to buld trust and bonds across the ethnic and sectarian divide.
3) Lebanon shows how it could be done: Sure, 25 years after the civil war, much and more ist o be criticized about Lebanon. Sure, sectarianism there is stifling social and political progress. Still, it managed to pacify the country. On an everyday basis, all 18 religious denominations live alongside peacefully–and all this despite the additional tensions that came with Syrian civil war.
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02
Inna Veleva's picture
Votes : 6
Peaceful coexistance will be possible once external stakeholders stop fueling a multi-proxy war.
What once started started as civil uprising in protest of government corruption, arbitrary arrests and repression has soon been overshadowed by a rhetoric of sectarian violence fueling apocalytic religious divisions. The orchestrated Sunni-Shia divide provided a convenient setting for Iran and Saudi Arabia to wage their rivalry on Syrian soil, locking horns over regional dominance.
The battlefield in Syria as well as the multiple negotiation tables have also been perceived as Russia as an opportunity not only to secure strategic interests in Tartus and Latakiya but also to test the boundaries of international tolerance for increased Russian influence in the Middle East.
Furthermore, in view of US support for Kurdish fighters, Turkey has launched its own destructive intervention in the conflict attacking the People’s Protection Units YPG and Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces under the pretext of fighting terrorism. Any future negotiators should find a way to deal with President Erdogan's "anxiety" regarding the mere prospect of an idependent Syrian Kurdistan with its repurcussions for the Kurdish movement in Turkey.
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04
J S's picture
Votes : 0
Maybe the war stops, but the hate among the people will last for decades
The fragmented Syrian society harmed each other so subtantially and deeply that it will take generations to overcome hate and mistrust. By fostering the social separation by the different parties, it is even more unthinkable that Syrians from different social, ethnic and religious groups will live peacefully together
The end of the conflict is far away. With an ignorant and uneducated American President concentrating on interior politics, a struggling European Union with no commen strategy for Syria and a devi’ls bargain between Russia and Turkey, there will be definitely no humanitarian solution for Syria, maybe a facts on the ground solution, which will not promote freedom.
Syria falls apart and will do so in future. Several regional warlords will rise up and disappear, living and leading under the motto: survival of the strongest and most brutal. They take what they get - oil, drugs, women - and there is no will and strategy to form a new national entity with a social contract everybody can benefit from.
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All Contributions

01
Christoph Sydow's picture
Votes : 7
Syrians will be able to live peacefully together again, but the impetus most come from the diaspora.
1) The last centuries and decades have seen ethnic and confessional tensions in Syria. Still, Damascus, Aleppo, Latakia and other cities were centres of interaction–peacefully most of the time. This heritage is a robust basis to overcome the horrors of the civil war in the long run.
2) Millions of Syrians have fled the war abroad. Most of them are Sunnis, but many Shiites, Christians and Alawites had to leave their homes, as well. These diaspora communities have to take the initiative for reconciliation. Far away from home, they have the chance to buld trust and bonds across the ethnic and sectarian divide.
3) Lebanon shows how it could be done: Sure, 25 years after the civil war, much and more ist o be criticized about Lebanon. Sure, sectarianism there is stifling social and political progress. Still, it managed to pacify the country. On an everyday basis, all 18 religious denominations live alongside peacefully–and all this despite the additional tensions that came with Syrian civil war.
Expand
02
Inna Veleva's picture
Votes : 6
Peaceful coexistance will be possible once external stakeholders stop fueling a multi-proxy war.
What once started started as civil uprising in protest of government corruption, arbitrary arrests and repression has soon been overshadowed by a rhetoric of sectarian violence fueling apocalytic religious divisions. The orchestrated Sunni-Shia divide provided a convenient setting for Iran and Saudi Arabia to wage their rivalry on Syrian soil, locking horns over regional dominance.
The battlefield in Syria as well as the multiple negotiation tables have also been perceived as Russia as an opportunity not only to secure strategic interests in Tartus and Latakiya but also to test the boundaries of international tolerance for increased Russian influence in the Middle East.
Furthermore, in view of US support for Kurdish fighters, Turkey has launched its own destructive intervention in the conflict attacking the People’s Protection Units YPG and Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces under the pretext of fighting terrorism. Any future negotiators should find a way to deal with President Erdogan's "anxiety" regarding the mere prospect of an idependent Syrian Kurdistan with its repurcussions for the Kurdish movement in Turkey.
Expand
03
Axel M's picture
Votes : 0
The civil war in Syria will end and Syria will be divided into parts like Germany was in 1945.
The situation right now is horrible, that is a fact probably everyone agrees - Russia, the US, whoever. Unfortunately it is a fact, too, that all the participants in this war cannot agree on a solution until now. But I am a positive-minded guy and I really hope to see all Syrians living together peacefully together in their homecountry again, not as refugees in camps all over the world nor in war in Syria.
I am at the point that the only more or less realistic way to a longer term of (negative) peace is to divide the country into parts that are ruled by several governments. I do not know how this may look like but they should try to exist on their own, each. And some years later they should try to reunite in the hope that all participants of today agree in this step.
Expand

04
J S's picture
Votes : 0
Maybe the war stops, but the hate among the people will last for decades
The fragmented Syrian society harmed each other so subtantially and deeply that it will take generations to overcome hate and mistrust. By fostering the social separation by the different parties, it is even more unthinkable that Syrians from different social, ethnic and religious groups will live peacefully together
The end of the conflict is far away. With an ignorant and uneducated American President concentrating on interior politics, a struggling European Union with no commen strategy for Syria and a devi’ls bargain between Russia and Turkey, there will be definitely no humanitarian solution for Syria, maybe a facts on the ground solution, which will not promote freedom.
Syria falls apart and will do so in future. Several regional warlords will rise up and disappear, living and leading under the motto: survival of the strongest and most brutal. They take what they get - oil, drugs, women - and there is no will and strategy to form a new national entity with a social contract everybody can benefit from.
Expand

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